Adrian Gollner reception April 15 @ Patrick Mikhail Gallery, Ottawa


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ADRIAN GÖLLNER | THE MOVEMENT OF GEORGE GERSHWIN'S LEFT HAND PLAYING RHAPSODY IN BLUE, PT. 2 | INK ON PAPER | 8 X 10 INCHES | 2011

PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY PRESENTS RECENT DRAWINGS BY GEORGE GERSHWIN, AN EXHIBITION OF NEW WORKS BY ADRIAN GÖLLNER

RECENT DRAWINGS BY GEORGE GERSHWIN
APRIL 13 TO MAY 16, 2011

ARTIST RECEPTION:
FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011
5:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M.

ARTIST TALK:
SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011
2 P.M.

PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY is pleased to present RECENT DRAWINGS BY GEORGE GERSHWIN an exhibition of new works by conceptual artist ADRIAN GÖLLNER.

In the exhibition, Göllner presents two new series of drawings that plumb old technology for the human essences remaining within.  In the first series known as Clock Drawings, the artist utilizes the energy stored in the springs of old, vinatage, wind-up alarm clocks that he has collected over the years to create simple line drawings. Occasionally, he finds a clock that is perfectly good, but was over-wound by the owner and then set aside. Recently, Göllner discovered such a clock at an antique store--st ill in good condition and still over-wound. As he investigated further, he found that the energy stored in the spring of the clock appeared to be the direct physical energy of someone who, likely, passed away a long time ago.

In the second series entitled Recent Drawings by George Gershwin, Göllner turns to the hardy and inelegant player pianos of old Western movies.  As they sent scrolling punched paper rolls through their mechanisms, they automatically plunked out popular melodies for the saloon patrons.  By the early 1900s, however, player pianos had evolved into sophisticated instruments.  The reproducing piano played rolls that recorded not simply the sequence of notes required to render a musical composition, but the actual physical movement of the pianist as he or she performed. As a result, the artist discovered that what we hear from a repro ducing piano is not a sound recording, but a replaying of the original performance with all of the expression and timing of the featured pianist.  In an effort to produce the best quality sound possible, the developers of this technology succeeded in preserving something of the physical essence of the greatest composers and performers of the day.  Artists such as Gustav Mahler, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Claude Debussy, and George Gershwin.  Working with a Canadian piano restoration expert, Göllner has investigated how this reproducing technology might allow the original pianists themselves to make drawings. The method he has developed is simple and elegant.  Attach pens to the vacuum and pump mechanisms in the piano that recreated the expression and pedal work of the pianist, then hold the paper against the pens while the piano plays.  From 1915 to 1927 George Gershwin performed many of his own compositions in the creation of Duo-Art piano rolls for the Aeolian Company of New York.  By feeding song rolls such as Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, So Am I, and Swanee into a Duo-Art/Steinway & Sons piano, Göllner brought the instrument to life and caused the pens to dart about the paper with great energy. The result is a series of small, enigmatic, “recent” line drawings that were created, remarkably, by the hand of George Gershwin himself.

Adrian Göllner is a contemporary conceptual artist who holds an abiding interest in abstraction and the history of the last century. Of specific interest to Göllner are those points where trends in Modern design and art cross: the Bauhaus, the Soviet Avant-garde, and American industrial design of the 1930s. Sometimes described as a site-specific satirist, he employs a variety of mediums and techniques in a chameleon-like adaptation to the environments i n which he exhibits, Freely combining Cold War imagery, graphing techniques, and references to Modernism, and employing industrial production techniques, Göllner produces images and objects that are mildly subversive and that defy easy interpretation.

Over the last decade, Göllner has received more than 15 public art commissions in a number of cities including Vancouver, Ottawa, Toronto, and Berlin. Notable among these are an integrated sculpture for the Canadian Embassy in Berlin, and the project entitled Boulevard, in which he designed and created artistic street lighting for the City of Vancouver’s presentation of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. Most recently, he received two major commissions from the Department of Foreign Affairs Canada to create artwork for the new Canadian Embassy in Moscow. 

Göllner’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions throughout Canada, the United States, Europe, and New Zealand. He is the recipient of numerous grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, and the City of Ottawa. His work can be found in a number of collections, including the Anglo-Irish Bank, the Department of Foreign Affairs, the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa Art Gallery, City of Ottawa art collection, Carleton University Art Gallery, National Gallery of Canada Library, Art Gallery of Ontario Library, and Agnes Etherington Art Centre. Reviews and critical discourses of his work have appeared in Canadian Art, Border Crossings, C Magazine, Parachute, Saturday Night, and the Sunday Times. In 2007, he was awarded the prestigious Canada Council for the Arts Residency in Port of Spain, Trinidad. Göllner received a B.F.A. from Queen's University in 1987 and is a member of the Royal Canadian Academy.


IN OTHER GALLERY NEWS…

ANDREW WRIGHT’S PMG exhibition CORONAE travels to Toronto’s Peak Gallery where it will be on view as part of the Contact Toronto Photography Festival; April 28 to May 28, 2011.  www.peakgallery.com

As part of Ottawa’s giant Prairie Scene Festival, CINDY STELMACKOWICH appears in the exhibition A Prairie Snapshot, featuring works from the Canada Council Art Bank including Marcel Dzama, Joe Fafard, and Diana Thorneycroft. National Arts Centre Foyer, April 26 to May 8, 2011. www.prairiescene.ca/en/

Also as part of Prairie Scene, CINDY STELMACKOWICH presents the findings of her artist-in-residence project in a public talk in The Art Of Mourning In Ottawa: Revisioning Victorian Bereavement Artefacts at the Bytown Museum; April 30, 2011, 2 p.m. www.bytownmuseum.com

OLGA CHAGAOUTDINOVA appears in the launch exhibition for Toronto’s Contact Photography Festival at MOCCA from April 29 to June 5, 2011.  Entitled Figure & Ground: Dynamic Landscape and curated by Bonnie Rubenstein, it features Scarlett Hooft Graafland, Viviane Sassen, and Dayanita Singh.  www.mocca.ca


OPENING NEXT AT PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY…

ESSENTIAL PROJECTS SERIES: 002, JESSICA AUER, UNMARKED SITES, Book Launch, Thursday, May 19, 2011. 

STATE OF THE ART | May 25 To JULY 20, 2011 | Featuring Linda Chalmers, Dave and Jenn, Kristopher Karklin, Jennifer Lefort, Andrew Morrow, James Olley, and Amy Schissel.

LOOK FOR PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY AND ADRIAN GÖLLNER
IN THE APRIL 2011 ISSUE OF ARTFORUM MAGAZINE.

 

For more information:
PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY
2401 Bank Street
Ottawa Canada K1V 8R9
Tel. 613.746.0690  TF:  1.800.388.3298

E-mail: gallery@patrickmikhailgallery.com 
Web: www.patrickmikhailgallery.com